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Stay Home. Protect the NHS. Save Lives. For Oaklands families, help your child to stay 'connected' with us by joining in with our teachers singing songs & rhymes, and reading stories, found in the Parents section Movie Modelling clips. Learn a bit of Makaton and have fun at home. Stay Home. Protect the NHS. Save Lives.
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Oaklands School

Making Learning Fun

Home Page

Oaklands School

Making Learning Fun

Movie Modelling

Movie Modelling for Children and Parents to Sing Along To

 

Many of our children enjoy singing along to this song in our assemblies. Try watching the clip together first and then repeat it, trying to focus on one or two of the signs or words to join in with. The more familiar it becomes the more your child may recall the key words and actions.

 

I Dig My Garden

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Wind The Bobbin Up

 

The focus here is on joining in with the simple actions and copying the Makaton sign for 'window'. Can you join in?

Wind The Bobbin Up

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Animal Action

 

Watch the short film clip as Sally reads a book about lots of different animals. Can you 'Growl like a Gruffalo?'

Animal Actions

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The Wheels on The Bus

 

Join in with the actions as Abigail sings about The Wheels on The Bus.

The Wheels on The Bus

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One, Two, Three, Four, Five

 

Get those fingers ready to join in with Chloe singing One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Once I Caught a Fish Alive! Watch that fish doesn't bite your finger!

One, Two, Three, Four, Five. Once I Caught a Fish Alive!

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Three Cheeky Monkeys

 

Can you sign 'monkey'? Sing along with Nisha as those cheeky monkeys jump up and down on the bed.

Three Cheeky Monkeys

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Today Is Monday

 

Here is Hannah reading Today is Monday by Eric Carle. Try to keep up with the actions as they are repeated throughout the story.

Today Is Monday

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Five Little Peas In a Pea Pod Pressed

 

Watch as Kate counts how many peas there are in the pea pod, then join in as she sings one of our favourite songs. Wait for that POP! at the end.

Five Little Peas In a Pea Pod Pressed

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Miss Polly Had a Dolly

 

Here's Vicky, singing and signing Miss Polly Had a Dolly. Try to sign 'Dolly'. The action is like you are cradling a baby. Hold your arms still in this position for 'dolly'. If you rock your arms, that's the sign for 'baby' instead.

Miss Polly Had a Dolly

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I Can Sing A Rainbow

 

Look at all the many colours of the rainbow. Sing along with Manisha as she sings and signs the colours of the rainbow. Which is your favourite?

I Can Sing A Rainbow

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Dear Zoo

 

Listen to the animals as Rebecca reads the story Dear Zoo. Can you copy some of the noises the animals make?

Dear Zoo

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If You're Happy and You Know It!

 

Can you sign 'happy'? I'm sure if you join in with Saskia, trying the actions and Makaton signs in this song, it will make you feel happy.

If You're Happy and You Know It!

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Peter Rabbit Has a Fly Upon His Nose

 

Poor old Peter Rabbit. He just can't seem to get rid of that fly. Can you sign 'rabbit'? Join in with Eve, as she tries to 'flick' and 'flack' that fly away.

Peter Rabbit Has a Fly Upon His Nose

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Puffin Peter

 

Peter and Paul are the best of friends. But when Peter gets lost, can the whale help him to find his his friend again? Look at all of the different types of birds as Sally reads the story and whale helps Peter find his 'funny and noisy' friend again. 

Puffin Peter

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Everybody Do This!

 

Join in with Natasha as she sings about different parts of the body. Can you find your head, your knees, your shoulders, and your hands?

Everybody Do This!

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Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star

 

Laura sings this familiar song in her garden. Can you join in by signing 'star'? Perhaps you could look out of the window to see the sky and name what is there....clouds, birds, sun, moon.

Twinkle, Twinkle

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Movie Modelling for Children 'School is Closed'

 

Parents/carers have told us that some of our Oaklands children are finding it very difficult to understand why they are not coming to school currently. We have therefore filmed this short clip to try and show them that school is closed. We hope it is helpful. Perhaps you can practice the Makaton signs at home together.

School is Closed

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Movie Modelling at Oaklands


What is ‘Movie Modelling’?


There are many requests or instructions that we give to our children that we automatically expect them to understand. However, we know that children with Autism are visual learners, and often do not process the auditory instructions we give them. We can use alternative communication systems to support understanding such as Makaton signing or Picture Exchange Communication Systems (PECS), which gives them an additional cue. However, this does not necessarily show them what certain behaviours or responses should look like ie what does good sitting look like? We can sign it to reinforce the command but it does not help them to understand what good sitting actually looks like. Stemming from the work we have done with an experienced ABA therapist, the Communication, Language Intervention team (CLI), and our Speech and Language therapists, we have developed a range of clips for pupils at Oaklands to support them with their understanding of simple, key instructions. A good example of its impact has been the ‘Good Sitting’ clip which has been used across classes and in assemblies. Pupils of all abilities from around the school are now able to identify what good sitting looks like, mirroring the actions ‘hands on lap’ and ‘feet on floor’ and often imitating the associated language. This has had a positive impact, enabling pupils to be focused and ready for further learning. This clip is on the website as an example, but also a resource that can be used at home, to encourage your child to watch and sit, perhaps for example, before eating breakfast.


We know from research that children also have difficulties with generalising and understanding emotions. These can also be addressed through movie modelling ie different examples of what happy/sad/angry looks like, to try to support children to understand and read people’s faces, or examples of familiar men/women from school, with associated signing to support children with their understanding of prepositions (we know that the use of ‘he’/’she’ is particularly difficult for our children).


We can also use movie modelling to enhance core skills in movement sessions. We know from EYFS and theoretical research that Physical Development is fundamental to early stages of learning. There are key skills that children must acquire in order to progress. We have therefore developed our own bank of Movie Modelling Clip to accompany Big Moves!; a programme of fundamental movement skills.


We know that many of our children are motivated by technology and watching screens. There are some excellent resources on the internet for teaching children with Autism and/SEND. We know that our children respond particularly well to ‘Mr Tumble’/’Something Special’ and to ‘Singing Hands’. However, they are often part of a programme and cannot be used as a bespoke resource. By producing our own short movie clips we can teach specific behaviours for learning, or key skills which we as a school feel are key to our children’s development.


A Classroom Resource


We can use movie modelling as a classroom support. The clips can help to engage pupils’ interest and aid their understanding of our expectations. During most teaching sessions where tasks are introduced to children and explained, as a staff we currently model language, signing and actions. Our children are encouraged by this visual example and often copy. Some of the initial skills we teach children are simple actions such as clapping and stamping, and we seek different ways to engage and motivate children to copy or join in. Many of our children find attention difficult, and children with Autism may also avoid interacting with adults due to their diagnosis including difficulties with Social Interaction, therefore this different visual stimuli offers us an alternative (not as a replacement for Social Interaction but as a stimulus for learning and in addition to teaching social interaction skills). Another successful example has been when teaching Number. A movie model of three fingers appearing on the screen, accompanied by the simple instruction of an adult saying ‘Show me three’, encourages the child to look and imitate the action, in addition to the real-life adult in the room showing the action. Often, pupils have watched, required time to process and respond, but then copied the action and for some, they have copied the word. This has often worked where other methods of teaching a response has not.

Movie Modelling for Parents and Children at Home

 

Please watch these very short clips to see the types of instructions that we would use to help children understand very simple instructions. This will help them to develop their independence.  You could play them when you want your child to carry out one of these simple tasks to show them what it looks like i.e. taking their coat off. The movie clip will also help them to understand what you want them to do. Perhaps play it on an iPad, and then you say the instruction using the same words. The visual instructions will support them to understand what your words mean. If you use the same language each time you say the instruction, it will soon become clear.

 

We would love to know how you get on.

Use of simple instructions to 'Put coat on'

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Use of simple instructions to 'Take coat off'

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Good Sitting

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Use of simple instructions to 'Take shoes off'

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